Will shoot a normal pistol underwater

Hello everybody..

I don't know anything about weapons and such, so I have a little question (which you might find a bit "stupid")


So,

I know that it is not possible to shoot underwater with a firearm (rifle, pistol, etc.)

but what if the rifle or pistol has been submerged in water? do you have to rub them dry or do they work fine again?


Kind regards

PrImAx
some pistols in particular also work underwater, the best examples being the Glock and Sphinx, both of which advertise them.
Otherwise it is technically not such a big obstacle, the problem is more the absolutely inadequate ballistic performance, after a few meters the bullet speed drops to 0m / s due to the extremely high friction.

A military-grade rifle can withstand moisture and wetness without any problems, and has never noticed any loss of functionality, even if there are nasty rumors about the AR15, the barrels of which are said to have burst, but should probably be pushed back into the realm of legends.
Hello everybody

Here, too, there are pistes that shoot underwater:

Water sphinx

Greetings Gren21


So he talks more than he shoots. I think a weapon of war can withstand many times over. That was just boring.
QUOTE (OnkelKarl @ Dec 31, 2006, 10:57) [snapback] 859896 [/ snapback]



So he talks more than he shoots. I think a weapon of war can withstand many times over. That was just boring.




I once highlighted your mistake.
I once highlighted your mistake.


Abbreviation for "DENK":

Since I am not in possession of private fully automatic weapons due to applicable federal law, but only shoot official MP5s over 30 years old and know what the old things are doing or have been doing, I can only draw conclusions and have to assume that a modern war weapon has this "Torture-Test" of the "I-throw-my-magazine-in-the-pampas" will hardly impress Texasproll.

That's why I can only "think" that this weapon shouldn't be damaged by something like that, because it was designed for more important things than "film-me-cool-cowboy-with-the-cellphone-while-I-was- cool-do ".



I also know a video in which an MP7 is covered with dirt. The funzt too. He just throws his toys in the puddle and shakes them out (or whatever)
Thanks for your help..

but the guy in the video has only thrown the gun without a magazine ring .. would it also be possible to shoot with wet cartridges?
As long as the content isn't wet, this shouldn't be a big problem.
That brings me to the question of how water-resistant are commercially available cartridges? In theory, the bullet should be pressed so tightly into the case that it closes tightly and thus no water can penetrate. And the mechanics of the rifle should not be affected by a little water be impressed.
QUOTE (PrImAx @ Dec 30th 2006, 8:01 pm) [snapback] 859781 [/ snapback]

I know that it is not possible to shoot underwater with a firearm (rifle, pistol, etc.)


A cartridge should always be implemented. With a G36 you should get problems with the second at the latest because it is unlikely (I can't try it out well) that a cartridge will be tracked.

It certainly gives a nice picture when I hold the G36 in a puddle the next time I shoot and just bend it 2 three times
here's a real group of experts at the start, I'm going crazy.

This is now addressed to all people who think that they have to delight us with their half-knowledge:
I know that this forum would be as good as empty if only people who knew about the topic would post here, and of course anyone with little / no experience in the weapons sector is free to ask anything they want to know.
but gentlemen, when exactly the same people try to answer questions, or throw a few assumptions / assertions into the room, it really pisses me off.

think about it.
Half knowledge? Show me the video in which someone shoots or tries to shoot underwater with a G36. Only then is it clear to me whether it works or not!

Furthermore, I don't know what this shitty arrogant tone is just because you have a few posts here in the forum and someone made it a mod ...

Think about it
Half knowledge? Show me the video in which someone shoots or tries to shoot underwater with a G36. Only then is it clear to me whether it works or not!


Hehe. class
I am curious to see which of the gentlemen in the Bundeswehr volunteer to do so. Because ONLY they can present the final solution to the thread starter.

As a P7, USP and MP5 user, I can only shine here with only half knowledge:
And I am NOT going to fire my sour savings USP in the bathtub


In "Clever" someone shot underwater with a Walther P99.
The projectile turns a "screw", so to speak a curve in the direction of the course of the trains. And tumble to the ground after about 10-15 meters.

You don't meet anything. There is nothing with a straight trajectory.

Hope to have contributed another clue.
QUOTE (ekori @ Jan 2nd 2007, 7:45 pm) [snapback] 860219 [/ snapback]
Show me the video in which someone shoots or tries to shoot underwater with a G36. Only then is it clear to me whether it works or not!

Do not know anything yourself, but then post such statements:
With a G36 you should get problems with the second at the latest because it is unlikely (I can't try it out well) that a cartridge will be tracked.

is exactly what is generally called Half knowledge referred to as.
QUOTE (Nite @ Jan 2nd 2007, 9:51 pm) [snapback] 860247 [/ snapback]

QUOTE (ekori @ Jan 2nd 2007, 7:45 pm) [snapback] 860219 [/ snapback]
Show me the video in which someone shoots or tries to shoot underwater with a G36. Only then is it clear to me whether it works or not!

Do not know anything yourself, but then post such statements:
With a G36 you should get problems with the second at the latest because it is unlikely (I can't try it out well) that a cartridge will be tracked.

is exactly what is generally called Half knowledge referred to as.


Mmm. Well, one cartridge will work because I also saw the Clever show in which, as previously reported, a P99 was fired underwater. So it is in principle possible to shoot with normal but wet Mun.

The second shot is basically a problem because the G36 is a gas pressure charger and you therefore have a problem with ejecting and feeding the new cartridge. Similar to the problems with MPG and maneuver ammunition. Since the G36 system was principally not developed for shooting under water, I think that it cannot work. As I said, I'm only talking about the shot, not the v0, the possible trajectory, let alone the distance the bullet travels in slow motion.

All in all, you are right as long as I don't try it myself or someone else proves everything that is written here will only be of a theoretical nature. But to dismiss that as half-knowledge and then in the wording that some moderators put on the day, I consider the wrong way ...
Right, if only people are allowed to post here who have personal experience with the topic then we can close down here.

On the other hand, I don't have to have children myself to be able to have a say in questions of upbringing.

If someone has real competence to contribute, then he can do so without puffing himself up here.

Just answer questions and, where that is not possible, just keep asking ...
QUOTE (Hummingbird @ Jan 3rd 2007, 05:50 AM) [snapback] 860318 [/ snapback]

Right, if only people are allowed to post here who have personal experience with the topic, then we can close down here.

On the other hand, I don't have to have children myself to be able to have a say in questions of upbringing.

If someone has real competence to contribute, then he can do so without puffing himself up here.

Just answer questions and, where that is not possible, just keep asking ...


Well spoken.

In the case of war ammunition, the projectile and the detonator should be sealed with paint. Ammunition like this has to be able to withstand a few hours under water. There are even supposed to be manufacturers who put a couple of hundred cartridges in water and oil from each lot. After that, they still have to work. Pressing in alone does not make a cartridge watertight in any case.
The topic "big eggs" is now finally over, otherwise there's something between the horns
I know from my time at that time that we were obliged to pull the barrel through with the AK-74 if the weapon was in the water or otherwise water got into the barrel. Because of the small caliber and the associated capillary effect, water does not flow completely out of the 5.45 mm barrel. It was said that there was a risk that the barrel would otherwise bulge when shooting.
Shooting directly under water with a "normal" rifle does not seem advisable to me.

(archibald_tuttle @ Jan 5th 2007, 00:00) [snapback] 860647 [/ snapback]
YOU ACTUALLY HAVE NO TIME OR ARE NOT IN THE MISSION 5 MINUTES GOOGLE TO USE ?
Archibald is back again!
(archibald_tuttle @ Jan 5th 2007, 00:00) [snapback] 860647 [/ snapback]


Why do I suddenly think of eggs and thick, or even very thick eggs?
Am I now a dumbass if I spontaneously come up with a rifle from the East that was even built for that purpose? Or do I just see the statement too general?
If you want to know exactly: You only came out when you chose the greatly simplified representation instead of reading the cited texts.

Nobody prevents you from providing links (hkpro.com or world.guns.ru) to underwater weapons, which are in passing here.

Just because a weapon doesn't explode when you use it underwater doesn't mean it makes sense. It obviously comes to one significant increase in pressure and if a 5.56 mm rifle is more sensitive to this than a 7.62 mm rifle, then it is not because of how the rifle is constructed, but simply to the barrel diameter (capillary action of the water) and the normally present gas pressure. What works under controlled conditions with new weapons and clear water turns into a game of chance in reality. You can also remove a stuck bullet with the trigger finger, but that doesn't exactly show reason.

(Stefan Kotsch @ Jan 4th 2007, 12:38 pm) [snapback] 860507 [/ snapback]

I know from my time at that time that we were obliged to pull the barrel through with the AK-74 if the weapon was in the water or otherwise water got into the barrel. Because of the small caliber and the associated capillary effect, water does not flow completely out of the 5.45 mm barrel. It was said that there was a risk that the barrel would otherwise bulge when shooting.
Shooting directly under water with a "normal" rifle therefore does not seem advisable to me.


With "directly under water" you probably mean completely under water / completely flooded weapon. This is AFAIK rather uncritical than a partially flooded. In other words, water droplets in the barrel are more stressful than a barrel that is completely filled with water, since there are no such jerky load peaks.

(archibald_tuttle @ Jan 5th 2007, 00:00) [snapback] 860647 [/ snapback]


YOU ACTUALLY HAVE NO TIME OR ARE NOT IN THE MISSION 5 MINUTES GOOGLE TO USE ?


Our dear Archibald hereby issues a warning and a write block for 24 hours.

Anyone else?
(Ta152 @ Jan 5th 2007, 2:05 pm) [snapback] 860702 [/ snapback]

(Stefan Kotsch @ Jan 4th 2007, 12:38 pm) [snapback] 860507 [/ snapback]

I know from my time at that time that we were obliged to pull the barrel through with the AK-74 if the weapon was in the water or otherwise water got into the barrel. Because of the small caliber and the associated capillary effect, water does not flow completely out of the 5.45 mm barrel. It was said that there was a risk that the barrel would otherwise bulge when shooting.
Shooting directly under water with a "normal" rifle does not seem advisable to me.


With "directly under water" you probably mean completely under water / completely flooded weapon. This is AFAIK rather uncritical than a partially flooded. In other words, water droplets in the barrel are more stressful than a barrel completely filled with water, since there are no such jerky load peaks.





If there are drops in the barrel, the sudden change in pressure may lead to tension peaks in the barrel, which, as already mentioned, can lead to bulges.
But since no bullet is 100% gas-tight, there is always a small slip of powder gases that hiss past the bullet and, together with the air pushed by the bullet, usually blow such droplets out of the barrel before contact with the bullet is made.

if a weapon is fired completely under water, the effect is similar to a flooded torpedo tube.
There is then no more sudden change in pressure, in contrast to, for example, if you partially put the barrel of the gun into the water and then fire a shot.

(so I can only confirm ta in his statement)
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